A Challenge to Redefine Apple

"Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact, and that is, everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you ... the minute that you understand that you can poke life ... that you can change it, you can mold it ... that's maybe the most important thing." 

 - Steve Jobs (Just before he died, in the documentary “One Last Thing”) 

 

 

Apple, started in a garage on April Fool’s Day 36 years ago, has become the largest company in the world – larger than GE, Boeing, Ford and GM combined.  With $566 billion in market capitalization, it is the 25th largest economy in the world – bigger than most countries.   Their nearly $100 billion in cash would be enough to wipe out the debt of eight European countries.  Apple continuously reinvents itself, its products and every industry it touches.  But, that’s not enough.  Twenty-first century leaders are expected to do more. 

The 2012 “GE Global Innovation Barometer” survey of 1000 global executives reported that the greatest innovations of our time will be those that help address human need, more so than those that produce the most profit.  Steve Jobs recruited John Scully away from PepsiCo asking “Do you want to sell sugar water for the rest of your life or do you want to come with me and change the world?”  How would Apple’s CEO Tim Cook answer a similar question: “Do you want to simply make gadgets for the rest of your life or do you want to change the world?” 

Leaders don’t just make or improve products; they create and redefine industries. They change the rules of the game. Companies must continuously redefine how they do business and continue to innovate in ways that are profitable and provide value to the greater good.  Apple must go beyond dazzling consumers with the latest i-anything.  Just as they have reinvented music, personal computing and the telephone, Apple can also spur education innovation, address labor issues in its supply chain and produce environmentally sound products.  Some of Apple’s vast resources could be invested in R&D labs to bring together great minds to create innovations that don’t merely feed the cash machine, but amaze the mind, nourish the spirit and restore the planet.   

Home Page Teaser: 
Apple, started in a garage on April Fool’s Day 36 years ago, has become the largest company in the world – larger than GE, Boeing, Ford and GM combined. With $566 billion in market capitalization, it is the 25th largest economy in the world – bigger than most countries. Their nearly $100 billion in cash would be enough to wipe out the debt of eight European countries. Apple continuously reinvents itself, its products and every industry it touches. But, that’s not enough.

Comments

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.