Time Person of the Year 2011: ‘The Protester’

As it has for the past eight decades, Time magazine selected its person of the year for 2011.  This year’s designation doesn’t go to a person at all.  Time selected “The Protester.”

 

“No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square, it would incite protests that would topple dictators and start a global wave of dissent,” Time writes. “In 2011, protesters didn’t just voice their complaints; they changed the world.”

 

In 2011 “The Protester’s” voice of dissent echoed throughout Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. The Protester rose up in Spain and in Greece, over unstable economies and austerity measures. Rigged elections in countries such as Russia and the Democratic Republic of Congo caught the attention of The Protester.  The Occupy Wall Street protester spread from New York throughout the U.S. to Washington, Chicago, Atlanta and many more cities and became “Occupy Whatever.”

 

Calling this a “global tipping point of frustration,” the Time article reminds us “History only emerges in retrospect.” We will only understand the significance of these uprisings when they are looked backed on.   But, we all need to be paying attention today and making changes to our businesses, communities and governments.  Stakeholders – whether they are called customers, citizens, employees, suppliers or protesters – have amazing power to enact change. 

 

Sources: Kurt Anderson, Time Magazine “Time Person of the Year 2011”, December 14, 2011  http://www.time.com/time/person-of-the-year/2011/

Elizabeth Flock, Washington Post, “Time Person of the Year 2011: The Protestor”

December 14, 2011 http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/blogpost/post/time-person-of-the-year-2011-the-protester/2011/12/14/gIQAvZtntO_blog.html

Home Page Teaser: 
As it has for the past eight decades, Time magazine selected its person of the year for 2011. This year’s designation doesn’t go to a person at all. Time selected “The Protester.” “No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square, it would incite protests that would topple dictators and start a global wave of dissent,” Time writes. “In 2011, protesters didn’t just voice their complaints; they changed the world.”

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